NASA and The European Space Agency

In 2017 Ann took part in an expedition with Martin Hartley and Bernice Notenboom to ski the last 2 degrees to the North Pole, once again collecting vital data to help scientists better understand the affect climate change is having on the Arctic Ocean.

Over the past 20 years Ann has witnessed first hand the disappearing ice in an environment she feels passionate about. Less then 0.5% of the world population lives in the Arctic, yet this area suffers the most from climate change. It is not just the rapid melt that is cause for concern but the amplifications of climate feedbacks that might warn us of bigger disasters ahead.

In 2016 the ice extent hit a new record low due to warm water influx from the Atlantic. This trend is setting us up for a potential unprecedented ice-free Central Arctic in the summer months.

The expedition partnered with the European Space Agency and NASA by plotting snow measurements as they skied from 88° to 90° North. NASA’s Icebridge program flew over the team and their snow transects to take their own measurements and compare the results. The team placed tracking beacons on the ice so that NASA could monitor ice movement in the Arctic during the long summer melt. The expedition was a huge success.

Ann once again placed tracking beacons at the North Pole in 2018 while guiding a film crew working in that region.

She continues to work with NASA, NOAA, The European Space Agency and other scientific bodies using her specific skillset to further scientific research at the very top of our planet